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October 22, 2014

How to Fix Common Computer Network Issues

Are you experiencing problems with your computer network? Are these error messages appearing?:

  • Unable to clear the DNS cache
  • Unable to renew your IP address
  • An operation was performed on something that is not a socket
  • Unable to clear the ARP cache

If so, here are some potential solutions for Windows XP/Vista.

Steps

  1. Fix Common Computer Network Issues Step 1.jpg
    1
    Check to make sure your computer is on and is connected to a network.
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  2. 2
    Be aware that Windows has a built in function to repair a network connection. This function can give valuable information in the form of an error message if you know what you are looking for. Some common error messages given are:
    • Unable to clear the DNS cache
    • Unable to renew your IP address
    • Unable to clear the ARP cache
  3. Fix Common Computer Network Issues Step 3.jpg
    3
    Deal with a message that states "Unable to clear the DNS cache. When you get the message “Unable to clear the DNS cache”, this usually means that the DNS client service has been disabled. Follow these steps as an administrator to re-enable it:



    • Open the Services MMC plugin, located under Administrative Tools in the Control Panel;
    • Find the “DNS Client” service in the list presented and enter it's properties by double-clicking it;
    • Change the Startup Type from Disabled to Manual or Automatic then click apply;
    • Either reboot or click “Start” to start the service;
    • Verify by attempting to repair the connection again.
  4. Fix Common Computer Network Issues Step 4.jpg
    4
    Fix a problem related to an IP address. If the repair process reports that it has been 'Unable to obtain an IP address', it is probable that more information can be obtained through the command line. Open a Command Prompt by going to Start > Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt, then type 'ipconfig /renew' to attempt to obtain an IP address from the command line.
  5. 5
    Follow up the error messages that will likely appear. There is a high likelihood of an error message similar to the one below occurring, the remainder of the guide will focus on this error.
    • “An operation was performed on something that is not a socket"
  6. 6
    Fix the error message "An operation was performed on something that is not a socket. : This is a Winsock corruption generally due to spyware. The fixes are:



    Fix Common Computer Network Issues Step 6.jpg
    • A simple fix can be done with Windows XP SP2 or Windows Vista (Start > Run > cmd > netsh winsock reset), then reboot your computer. If you do not have SP2, you can download a small program to reinstall Winsock: winsockfix.exe.

May 12, 2014

How to resolve wifi signal problem

Resolving poor wireless signal

There are a few factors why your wireless device is getting low or poor signal from the router.  This article will guide you on how to resolve these issues.

Low or poor signal is mainly caused by six (6) major factors:

      •    Distance problems
      •    Physical obstructions
      •    Wireless interferences
      •    Transmit rate on the wireless router
      •    Outdated firmware on the router
      •    Power outage

Distance problems

Wireless devices have limitations when it comes to their signal range.  For devices running on 2.4 GHz, the range can go up to 100-150 feet (30-46 meters).  If your wireless network devices are too far from each other, consider relocating the devices.  Remember that distance is directly proportional to signal strength.  The farther you are from the access point, the weaker the signal.

To check if you’re getting a stable connection, perform a continuous ping.  If you’re getting replies most of the time, this means the connection is stable.  If time outs are occurring frequently, the connection is not that stable.  For instructions on how to perform a continuous ping on your computer, see the article below:

Pinging the Linksys router

To get the best connection, you may need to find ways to move your computer closer to the center of the router’s range.  When choosing an area where the router will be placed, ensure that it is well ventilated.

Physical obstructions

Wireless networks are also susceptible to obstructions that may lead to low signal.  Oftentimes, the signal gets reflected, refracted, or absorbed by the obstruction.

Common obstructions are:

      •    Cabinets or drawers
      •    Mirrors, Glasses
      •    Metal Objects
      •    Thick walls and ceilings
      •    Aquariums

If you have any of these objects between your wireless adapter and access point, consider relocating your access point somewhere high to get around the obstruction.

Routers have a default broadcast range that is dependent on their wireless networking standard (Wireless -B, -A, -G, -N, -AC draft) and the wireless signals broadcasted by the router may not be able to completely penetrate thick walls and other common obstructions.

Also, you may use a Linksys range extender or Powerline to boost the signal of your router if you have a big area and there are a lot of obstructions between your router and the wireless device.  For more information about how to expand your network using Powerline adapters, click here.

Wireless interferences

Common sources of interference are:

      •    Neighboring wireless networks
      •    Microwave ovens
      •    2.4 GHz cordless telephones
      •    Bluetooth® devices
      •    Wireless baby monitors

To solve the problem, change the channel and SSID on your access point.  Preferred channels to use are 16and 11 since they’re considered as non-overlapping channels.

The 802.11b/a/g/n standards use the 2.4 Gigahertz (GHz) band.  With this frequency, 802.11b/a/g/n equipment may encounter interference from microwave ovens, cordless telephones, Bluetooth® devices, and other appliances using the same band.  To learn how to change your wireless router’s channel, see the article below:

Changing the wireless channel on a Linksys router

You can also select the 40 MHz channel width on your 2.4 GHz network to improve the performance of your Wireless-N network.  However, this is only advisable if you are in a location less crowded with wireless networks.  It is also important to note that in order for your wireless devices to connect to the network, they need to have a Wireless-N network adapter that is compatible with the 40 MHz wireless channel.  The latest versions of Linksys Wireless-N adapters can connect to a 2.4 GHz network with 40 MHz radio band.

QUICK TIP:  The Linksys Smart Wi-Fi Routers have the 40 and 80 MHz Channel widths in the 5.0 GHz network.

If you are not sure about the settings, it is best to leave it at its default settings.  The channel width is set to Auto by default.  This automatically defines the best wireless channel for your wireless network.

Transmit rate on the wireless router

Changing the Transmit Rate on the router allows the device to work at a specific speed for wireless transmissions.  The default Transmit Rate is Auto with a range of 1 to 54 Mbps.

The rate of data transmission should be set depending on the speed of your wireless network.  You can select from a range of transmission speeds or keep the default setting, Auto.  This will allow the router to automatically use the fastest possible data rate and enable the Auto-Fallbackfeature, which will negotiate the best possible connection speed between the router and a wireless client.

NOTE:  If the transmit rate on the router or the adapter is not set to Auto, the Auto-Fallback feature will be disabled.  If the Auto-Fallback is disabled, you will not be able to experience the maximum range of the wireless router as it will not be able to adapt to the environment’s condition.

Linksys does NOT recommend changing the transmit rate of the router other than the default value since it will shorten the range of the wireless network as shown in the sample diagram below.

If you can't get connected into your router after changing the transmit rate to AUTO, try to change the transmit rate manually by using the router’s web-based setup page.  You can do this by accessing the router’s web-based setup page, then click on Wireless > Advanced Wireless Settings.  You can set your preferred rate on the Transmission Rate drop-down.

Outdated firmware on the router

Outdated firmware on the router can sometimes cause connection issues in your network.  To fix this, you need to upgrade the firmware of your router.  To properly do this, click here.  For a video on how to upgrade the router’s firmware, click here.

Power outage

One factor that may also trigger the poor performance or loss of wireless signals coming from the router would be power/electricity interruptions.  If you are not able to acquire any wireless signal after a power outage, you may powercycle the router by unplugging and re-plugging the power cord from the power outlet for 10 seconds.

However, if the powercycle still does not resolve the problem, you may need to reconfigure the wireless settings of your router.  Refer to the links below for more information:

NOTE:  Instructions for reconfiguration may vary depending on your router model.

May 12, 2014

Not able to ping computer

Not able to ping computer

 

Not able to ping computer

Anupama267
In my home network, we have 3 computers.. i am able to ping my computer and another computer..but i am not able to ping the 3rd computer..could anyone please help me out..
  • Choppit

    From the command prompt (assuming windows)

    ipconfig /all

    Assuming that your subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 then the first 3 octets should match your other PCs. If this is not the case and you're using DHDP do;

    ipconfig /renew

    Also check that you have a connection to your switch/router.

    try to check if that computer in the same work group as you and in the same network.

    Have you ensured the firewall on the computer that you are unable to ping is set to allow echo requests?

    Try this....

    1.From the Start menu, select either Control Panel, or Settings and then Control Panel. Click or double-click Network Connections to open the Network Connections window. 

    2.In the Network Connections window, right-click the icon for your primary Internet connection and select Properties. For example, if you connect using an Ethernet cable, right-click Local Area Connection; if you connect using VPN or dial-up, right-click the Virtual Private Network or Dial-up Connection.

    3.On the Advanced tab, under "Windows Firewall", click Settings... .

    4.The Windows Firewall panel will open. On the Advanced tab, under "ICMP", click Settings... .

    5.The ICMP Settings window will open. Check Allow incoming echo request.

    6.Click OK three times.

    Kerah

    try to check if that computer in the same work group as you and in the same network.

    Have you ensured the firewall on the computer that you are unable to ping is set to allow echo requests?

    Try this....

    1.From the Start menu, select either Control Panel, or Settings and then Control Panel. Click or double-click Network Connections to open the Network Connections window. 

    2.In the Network Connections window, right-click the icon for your primary Internet connection and select Properties. For example, if you connect using an Ethernet cable, right-click Local Area Connection; if you connect using VPN or dial-up, right-click the Virtual Private Network or Dial-up Connection.

    3.On the Advanced tab, under "Windows Firewall", click Settings... .

    4.The Windows Firewall panel will open. On the Advanced tab, under "ICMP", click Settings... .

    5.The ICMP Settings window will open. Check Allow incoming echo request.

    6.Click OK three times.

May 12, 2014

How to Set Up a Wireless Router

Connecting the HardwareConfiguring the RouterConnecting Your Devices

Edited by Losangeleslakerz, Maluniu, CQinPDX, TJean

As more and more devices are able to connect to wireless networks, setting up a wireless router has become a crucial step for virtually any home network. Setting up a wireless network will allow your devices to connect to the internet from anywhere in the house, without the need for messy wires. To get started setting your network up, see Step 1 below.

Part 1 of 3: Connecting the Hardware

  1. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 1 Version 2.jpg
    1
    Purchase a wireless router. Routers come in all shapes and sizes. Compare features to find the router that is right for you. If you have more area that you need to cover, or have lots of walls in your home, you’ll need a router with more antennas.
    • All modern routers should support 802.11n, or Wireless-N). This is the most stable and quickest frequency, and is backwards compatible with older standards such as 802.11g.
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  2. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 2 Version 2.jpg
    2
    Connect your router to your modem. Wireless routers enable you to share your broadband internet connection with multiple devices. To do so, you will need to connect your broadband modem to the router. For best results, place your router near your modem.
    • Connect the router and the modem with an Ethernet cable. Most routers come packaged with a short Ethernet cable that you can use for this.
      Set Up a Wireless Router Step 2Bullet1.jpg
    • Connect the modem to the WAN/Internet port on your router. It is usually offset, and may be color-coded (typically yellow).
      Set Up a Wireless Router Step 2Bullet2.jpg
  3. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 3 Version 2.jpg
    3
    Connect any devices you want to hardwire. If you have computers that are close, or a video game console or TV, you can connect them to the router via Ethernet. This will result in a more stable and faster connection, and doesn’t require any extra configuration.
  4. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 4 Version 2.jpg
    4
    Connect at least one computer via Ethernet. You will need at least one computer connecting via Ethernet cable in order to adjust your router settings. You can disconnect this computer afterwards if you want to connect wirelessly.

Part 2 of 3: Configuring the Router

  1. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 5 Version 2.jpg
    1
    Find the IP address of the router. Most newer routers have this printed on a label affixed to the router. Older models will have this listed in the documentation. If you can’t find the router’s IP address anywhere, you can do a web search for the router model to see what the default address is.[1]
    • IP addresses are formatted as four groups of up to three digits, separated by periods.
    • Most default IP addresses are 192.168.1.1, 192.168.0.1, or 192.168.2.1.
  2. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 6 Version 2.jpg
    2
    Open a web browser on the computer that is connected to the router. Enter in the IP address of the router into the address bar and press Enter. Your browser will attempt to connect to the router’s configuration menu.
    • If your router came with an installation disc, you can run the configuration program from that instead. It will accomplish many of the same functions.
  3. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 7 Version 2.jpg
    3
    Enter your username and password. In order to access the configuration page, you will need to enter a valid username and password. Most routers have a basic account set up that you will need to use to log on. This varies from model to model, but should be printed on the router or in the documentation.
    • The most typical username is “admin”.
      Set Up a Wireless Router Step 7Bullet1.jpg
    • The most typical passwords are “admin” and “password”.
      Set Up a Wireless Router Step 7Bullet2.jpg
    • Many routers will only require a username and a blank password, and some allow you to leave all fields blank.
      Set Up a Wireless Router Step 7Bullet3.jpg
    • If you can’t figure out your username and password, search for your router model online to see what the default login is. If it has been changed, press the Reset button on the back of the router for 10 seconds to restore factory defaults.
      Set Up a Wireless Router Step 7Bullet4.jpg
  4. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 8 Version 2.jpg
    4
    Open the Wireless Settings. When you log in to your router, you will be taken to the router’s main menu or status screen. There will be several options to choose from. The Internet section can usually be left at default settings, unless you received specific instructions from your internet service provider. The Wireless section will allow you to set up your wireless network.
  5. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 9 Version 2.jpg
    5
    Enter a name for your wireless network. In the Wireless section, you should see a field labeled SSID or Name. Enter a unique name for your wireless network. This is what other devices will see when scanning for networks.
    • Check the box to enable SSID broadcast. This will essentially “turn on” the wireless network.
      Set Up a Wireless Router Step 9Bullet1.jpg
  6. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 10 Version 2.jpg
    6
    Choose a security method. Choose from the list of available security options. For the best security, choose WPA2-PSK as the encryption method. This is the most difficult security to crack, and will give you the most protection from hackers and intruders.
  7. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 11 Version 2.jpg
    7
    Create a passphrase. Once you’ve chosen your security method, enter in a passphrase for the network. This should be a difficult password, with a combination of letters, numbers, and symbols. Don’t use any passwords that could be easily deduced from your network name or from knowing you.
  8. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 12 Version 2.jpg
    8
    Save your settings. Once you are finished naming and securing your wireless network, click the Apply or Save button. The changes will be applied to your router, which may take a few moments. Once the router has finished resetting, your wireless network will be enabled.
  9. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 13 Version 2.jpg
    9
    Change your router’s username and password. Once you have your network configured, you should change the username and password that you use to access your router. This will help protect your router from unauthorized changes. You can change these from the Administration section of the router configuration menu.[2]
  10. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 14 Version 2.jpg
    10
    Block sites. If you want to prevent devices that are connected to your network from accessing certain websites, you can use built-in blocking tools to restrict access. These can be found in the Security/Block section of the router.
    • You can usually block by specific domain names, or by keywords.

Part 3 of 3: Connecting Your Devices

  1. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 15 Version 2.jpg
    1
    Connect a computer, tablet, or smartphone to the network. Scan for the wireless network. On any device that supports wireless networks, you should see your new network as long as you are within range of the router. Select it and you will be prompted for the passphrase.
  2. Set Up a Wireless Router Step 16 Version 2.jpg
    2
    Enter your wireless passphrase. Once you enter the passphrase, your device will be automatically connected to the wireless network. The network will be stored in your devices memory and will automatically connect whenever you are within range.
    • For detailed instructions on selecting and joining a wireless network for your specific computer, tablet, or smartphone, follow this guide.
  3. 3
    Connect your other devices. Besides other computers and tablets, you can connect other devices as well, such as printers, game consoles, TVs and more. See the following guides for instructions for your specific device.
Add your own method

Tips

  • If you have procured a used wireless router from a friend or store, make sure to reset it to factory settings before installing it. It may try to configure your wireless network according to the previous system. Find the reset button on the router, and press it for 30 seconds with a pin or pencil.

May 12, 2014

How to connect to wifi

How to connect to wifi

Wifi is a wireless broadband connection that allows you to connect to the internet without using any cables. It’s particularly popular for use with laptops because they can then be used in any room of the house. Wifi is also available in lots of public places, such as pubs, cafés, hotels and even some buses!

This guide will help you to understand how to connect your computer to wifi. It’s based on Windows 7, but the procedure is very similar in other versions of Windows and in Mac OS X. 

 
What you’ll need:
 
  • a wireless router
  • a computer with a built-in wireless adaptor or a separate adaptor.
Follow these step-by-step instructions to connect to wifi
 
Wireless routerStep 1: Set up your wireless router - an example of which is on the right - (see How to connect to the internet for instructions). Most internet providers now supply wireless routers as standard. When setting up one, it’s important to provide appropriate security so that your computer can’t be entered by anyone but you. Instructions for this should be supplied with the router, but if in doubt, consult an expert.
 
Built in wireless adaptorStep 2: Check that your computer has a built-in wireless adaptor (see left). Up-to-date laptops generally have one, but most desktop computers don’t.
 
To check whether there’s a built-in adaptor, follow these steps:
 
 
 
  • Click the Start button.
  • Right-click Computer.
  • Click Properties.

To check if built in wireless adaptor

  • Click Device Manager.

Device manager

  • Click the arrow next to ‘Network Adaptors’ to see if there’s a wifi adaptor listed.
If there is a wifi adaptor, a wifi icon should also appear in the system tray in the bottom right-hand corner of the screen. In Windows 7, 

it looks like the one on the right.Wifi icon

 
If you don’t have a wireless adaptor, you’ll need to buy one to plug into one of your computer’s USB ports. The adaptor should be supplied complete with instructions on how to use it to connect to a wireless network.
 
Available networksStep 3: To connect to a wireless network, click the wifi icon. You should now see a list of available networks – an example is on the left.
 
Step 4: To connect to a network, just click on its name. If it’s a secure network and it’s the first time you’ve used it, you’ll need a password. If it’s your home network, your internet provider will have given you a password – sometimes it’s printed on a sticker attached to the router.
 
If you’ll be using the same connection regularly, you can tick the box to connect automatically.
 
Step 5: The first time you connect to a network, you’ll be asked to choose whether it’s a home, work or public network.
 
Warning: Be very careful if you connect to unsecured wireless networks such as wifi ‘hotspots’ in public places. While on them, it’s important not to use websites that require you to enter personal or financial details as other users of the network could gain access to these details.

May 12, 2014

All company default Router Passowrd

Router
Address
User name
Password

3Com

http://192.168.1.1

admin

admin

D-Link

http://192.168.0.1

admin

Linksys

http://192.168.1.1

admin

admin

Microsoft Broadband

http://192.168.2.1

admin

admin

Netgear

http://192.168.0.1

admin

password